30 Day IELTS Listening Challenge Day 12

No Comments

Photo of author

By Nguyễn Huyền

AUDIO

ĐỀ

Listen and fill in the gaps.

What would happen if you didn’t drink water?

Water is virtually everywhere, from 1…………………………. and ice caps, to the cells inside our own bodies. Depending on factors like location, fat index, age, and sex, the average human is between 2………………………….water. At birth, human babies are even wetter.  Being 3…………………………. water, they are swimmingly similar to 4………………………….. But their water composition drops to 5…………………………. by their first birthday. So what role does water play in our bodies, and how much do we actually need to drink to stay healthy? The H20 in our bodies works to cushion and lubricate joints, 6…………………………., and to nourish the brain and spinal cord.

Water isn’t only in our blood. An adult’s brain and heart are almost 7…………………………. water – that’s roughly equivalent to the amount of moisture in a banana. 8…………………………. are more similar to an apple at 9………………………….. And even seemingly dry human bones are 10…………………………. water. If we are essentially made of water, and surrounded by water, why do we still need to drink so much? Well,  each day we lose two to three liters through our 11…………………………., 12…………………………., and bowel movements, and even just from breathing.

While these functions are essential to our survival, we need to compensate for the fluid loss. Maintaining a balanced water level is essential to avoid dehydration or over-hydration, both of which can have devastating effects on overall health.

At first detection of low water levels, sensory receptors in the brain’s hypothalamus signal the release of antidiuretic hormone. When it reached the 13…………………………., it creates aquaporins, special channels that enable blood to 14…………………………. and 15…………………………. more water, leading to concentrated, dark urine. Increased dehydration can cause notable drops in 16…………………………., 17…………………………., 18…………………………., and 19…………………………., as well as signs of 20………………………….. A dehydrated brain works harder to accomplish the same amount as a normal brain, and it even temporarily 21………………………….. because of its lack of water. Over-hydration, or hyponatremia, is usually caused by overconsumption of water in a short amount of time.

22………………………….. are often the victims of over-hydration because of complications in regulating water levels in extreme physical conditions. Whereas the dehydrated brain amps up the production of antidiuretic hormone, the over-hydrated brain slows, or even stops, releasing it into the blood. Sodium electrolytes in the body become diluted, causing cells to swell. In severe cases, the 23………………………….. can’t keep up with the resulting volumes of dilute urine.

24………………………….. then occurs, possibly causing 25………………………….., 26………………………….., and, in rare instances, 27………………………….. or 28…………………………... But that’s a pretty extreme situation. On a normal, day-to-day basis, maintaining a well-hydrated system is easy to manage for those of us fortunate enough to have access to clean drinking water. For a long time, conventional wisdom said that we should drink eight glasses a day. That estimate has since been fine-tuned. Now, the consensus is that the amount of water we need to imbibe depends largely on our 29………………………….. and 30…………………………...

The recommended daily intake varies from between 31………………………….  liters of water for men, and about 32………………………….  liters for women, a range that is pushed up or down if we are healthy, active, old, or overheating. While water is the healthiest hydrator, other beverages, even those with 33………………………….  like coffee or tea, replenish fluids as well. And water within food makes up about 34………………………….  of our daily H20 intake. Fruits and vegetables like 35…………………………. , 36…………………………. , and even 37………………………….  are over 90% water, and can supplement liquid intake while providing 38………………………….  and 39…………………………. .

Drinking well might also have various long-term benefits. Studies have shown that optimal hydration can lower the chance of 40…………………………. , help manage 41…………………………., and potentially reduce the risk of certain types of cancer. No matter what, getting the right amount of liquid makes a world of difference in how you’ll feel, think, and function day to day.

 

ANSWER KEY

1. soil moisture 2. 55-60%3. 75%4. fish5. 65%6. regulate temperature7. three quarters (3/4)8. Lungs9. 83%10. 31%
11. sweat 12. urine13. kidneys14. absorb 15. retain16. energy17. mood18. skin moisture19. blood pressure20. cognitive impairment
21. shrinks22. Athletes23. kidneys24. Water intoxication25. headache26. vomiting 27. seizures 28. death29. weight30. environment
31. 2,5-3,732. 2-2,733. caffeine34. a fifth35. strawberries36. cucumbers37. broccoli 38. valuable nutrients39. fiber40. stroke 
41. diabetes

 

TRANSCRIPT

What would happen if you didn’t drink water?

Water is virtually everywhere, from [Q1] soil moisture and ice caps, to the cells inside our own bodies. Depending on factors like location, fat index, age, and sex, the average human is between [Q2] 55-60% water. At birth, human babies are even wetter.  Being [Q3] 75% water, they are swimmingly similar to [Q4] fish. But their water composition drops to [Q5] 65% by their first birthday. So what role does water play in our bodies, and how much do we actually need to drink to stay healthy? The H20 in our bodies works to cushion and lubricate joints, [Q6] regulate temperature, and to nourish the brain and spinal cord.

Water isn’t only in our blood. An adult’s brain and heart are almost [Q7] three quarters water – that’s roughly equivalent to the amount of moisture in a banana. [Q8] Lungs are more similar to an apple at [Q9] 83%. And even seemingly dry human bones are [Q10] 31% water. If we are essentially made of water, and surrounded by water, why do we still need to drink so much? Well,  each day we lose two to three liters through our [Q11] sweat, [Q12] urine, and bowel movements, and even just from breathing.

While these functions are essential to our survival, we need to compensate for the fluid loss. Maintaining a balanced water level is essential to avoid dehydration or over-hydration, both of which can have devastating effects on overall health.

At first detection of low water levels, sensory receptors in the brain’s hypothalamus signal the release of antidiuretic hormone. When it reached the [Q13] kidneys, it creates aquaporins, special channels that enable blood to [Q14] absorb and [Q15] retain more water, leading to concentrated, dark urine. Increased dehydration can cause notable drops in [Q16] energy, [Q17] mood, [Q18] skin moisture, and [Q19] blood pressure, as well as signs of [Q20] cognitive impairment. A dehydrated brain works harder to accomplish the same amount as a normal brain, and it even temporarily [Q21] shrinks because of its lack of water. Over-hydration, or hyponatremia, is usually caused by overconsumption of water in a short amount of time.

[Q22] Athletes are often the victims of over-hydration because of complications in regulating water levels in extreme physical conditions. Whereas the dehydrated brain amps up the production of antidiuretic hormone, the over-hydrated brain slows, or even stops, releasing it into the blood. Sodium electrolytes in the body become diluted, causing cells to swell. In severe cases, the [Q23] kidneys can’t keep up with the resulting volumes of dilute urine.

[Q24] Water intoxication then occurs, possibly causing [Q25] headache, [Q26] vomiting, and, in rare instances, [Q27] seizures or [Q28] death. But that’s a pretty extreme situation. On a normal, day-to-day basis, maintaining a well-hydrated system is easy to manage for those of us fortunate enough to have access to clean drinking water. For a long time, conventional wisdom said that we should drink eight glasses a day. That estimate has since been fine-tuned. Now, the consensus is that the amount of water we need to imbibe depends largely on our [Q29] weight and [Q30] environment.

The recommended daily intake varies from between [Q31] 2,5-3,7 liters of water for men, and about [Q32] 2-2,7 liters for women, a range that is pushed up or down if we are healthy, active, old, or overheating. While water is the healthiest hydrator, other beverages, even those with [Q33] caffeine like coffee or tea, replenish fluids as well. And water within food makes up about [Q34] a fifth of our daily H20 intake. Fruits and vegetables like [Q35] strawberries, [Q36] cucumbers, and even [Q37] broccoli are over 90% water, and can supplement liquid intake while providing [Q38] valuable nutrients and [Q39] fiber.

Drinking well might also have various long-term benefits. Studies have shown that optimal hydration can lower the chance of [Q40] stroke, help manage [Q41] diabetes, and potentially reduce the risk of certain types of cancer. No matter what, getting the right amount of liquid makes a world of difference in how you’ll feel, think, and function day to day.

Điều gì sẽ xảy ra nếu bạn không uống nước?

Nước hầu như ở khắp mọi nơi, từ [Q1] độ ẩm của đất và các chỏm băng, cho đến các tế bào bên trong cơ thể chúng ta. Tùy thuộc vào các yếu tố như vị trí, chỉ số mỡ, tuổi tác và giới tính, [Q2] 55-60% cơ thể người là nước. Khi mới sinh, trẻ sơ sinh thậm chí còn chứa nhiều nước hơn. Với [Q3] 75% là nước, chúng bơi lội tương tự như [Q4] . Nhưng thành phần nước của chúng giảm xuống còn [Q5] 65% vào ngày sinh nhật đầu tiên. Vậy nước đóng vai trò gì trong cơ thể chúng ta và chúng ta thực sự cần uống bao nhiêu để khỏe mạnh? H20 trong cơ thể chúng ta hoạt động để đệm và bôi trơn các khớp, [Q6] điều chỉnh nhiệt độ và nuôi dưỡng não và tủy sống.

Nước không chỉ có trong máu của chúng ta. Gần [Q7] 3/4 não và tim của một người trưởng thành là nước – tương đương với lượng ẩm trong một quả chuối. [Q8] Phổi giống như một quả táo với tỷ lệ nước là [Q9] 83%. Và cả xương người cũng chứa [Q10] 31% nước. Nếu chúng ta về cơ bản được tạo ra từ nước và được bao quanh bởi nước, tại sao chúng ta vẫn cần uống nhiều như vậy? Chà, mỗi ngày chúng ta mất từ ​​​​hai đến ba lít qua [Q10] mồ hôi, [Q11] nước tiểu và nhu động ruột, và thậm chí chỉ từ hơi thở.

Mặc dù các chức năng này rất cần thiết cho sự sống còn của chúng ta, nhưng chúng ta cần bù đắp lượng chất lỏng bị mất đi. Duy trì mức nước cân bằng là điều cần thiết để tránh mất nước hoặc thừa nước, cả hai đều có thể gây ra những tác động tàn phá đối với sức khỏe tổng thể.

Khi lần đầu tiên phát hiện mực nước thấp, các thụ thể cảm giác ở vùng dưới đồi của não báo hiệu việc giải phóng hormone chống bài niệu. Khi nó đến [Q13] thận, nó tạo ra aquaporin, các kênh đặc biệt cho phép máu [Q14] hấp thụ[Q15] giữ nhiều nước hơn, dẫn đến nước tiểu đậm đặc và sẫm màu. Việc mất nước gia tăng có thể gây ra sự sụt giảm đáng kể về [Q16] năng lượng, [Q17] tâm trạng, [Q18] độ ẩm của da[Q19] huyết áp, cũng như các dấu hiệu [Q20] suy giảm nhận thức. Một bộ não bị mất nước làm việc chăm chỉ hơn để hoàn thành cùng một khối lượng công việc như một bộ não bình thường, và nó thậm chí còn tạm thời [Q21] co lại vì thiếu nước. Thừa nước quá mức, hoặc hạ natri máu, thường do tiêu thụ quá nhiều nước trong một khoảng thời gian ngắn.

[Q21] Các vận động viên thường là nạn nhân của tình trạng thừa nước vì những biến chứng trong việc điều chỉnh lượng nước trong điều kiện thể chất khắc nghiệt. Trong khi não mất nước tăng cường sản xuất hormone chống bài niệu, thì não thừa nước sẽ làm chậm hoặc thậm chí ngừng giải phóng hormone này vào máu. Chất điện giải natri trong cơ thể bị pha loãng, khiến các tế bào sưng lên. Trong những trường hợp nghiêm trọng, [Q23] thận không thể theo kịp lượng nước tiểu loãng.

Sau đó, [Q24] nhiễm độc nước xảy ra, có thể gây [Q25] đau đầu, [Q26] nôn mửa và trong một số trường hợp hiếm gặp là [Q27] co giật hoặc [Q28] tử vong. Nhưng đó là một tình huống khá nghiêm trọng. Thông thường, hàng ngày, khá dễ để chúng ta – những người may mắn được tiếp cận nguồn nước sạch – uống đủ nước. Trong một thời gian dài, người ta khuyên rằng chúng ta nên uống tám ly mỗi ngày. Ước tính đó đã được tinh chỉnh. Bây giờ, người ta đồng ý rằng là lượng nước chúng ta cần tiêu thụ phụ thuộc phần lớn vào [Q29] trọng lượng[Q30] môi trường của chúng ta.

Lượng nước khuyến nghị hàng ngày dao động từ [Q31] 2,5-3,7 lít nước đối với nam và khoảng [Q32] 2-2,7 lít đối với nữ, sẽ ít hơn hay nhiều hơn tùy vào việc chúng ta khỏe mạnh, năng động, già hoặc quá nóng. Mặc dù nước là chất giữ ẩm tốt nhất cho sức khỏe, nhưng các loại đồ uống khác, ngay cả những loại có chứa [Q33] caffein như cà phê hoặc trà, cũng bổ sung chất lỏng. Và nước trong thực phẩm chiếm khoảng [Q34] 1/5 lượng H20 hàng ngày của chúng ta. Trái cây và rau quả như [Q35] dâu tây, [Q36] dưa chuột và thậm chí cả [Q37] bông cải xanh có hơn 90% là nước và có thể bổ sung lượng chất lỏng trong khi cung cấp [Q38] chất dinh dưỡng có giá trị[Q39] chất xơ.

Việc uống nước đầy đủ cũng có thể có nhiều lợi ích lâu dài. Các nghiên cứu đã chỉ ra rằng việc đủ nước có thể làm giảm nguy cơ [Q40] đột quỵ, giúp kiểm soát bệnh [Q41] tiểu đường và có khả năng làm giảm nguy cơ mắc một số loại ung thư. Dù thế nào đi chăng nữa, việc cung cấp đủ lượng chất lỏng sẽ tạo ra một thế giới khác biệt về cách bạn cảm nhận, suy nghĩ và hoạt động hàng ngày.

 

VOCAB

similar to …: tương tự

like somebody/something but not exactly the same

Ex. My teaching style is similar to that of most other teachers.

quarter /ˈkwɔːtə(r)/ (n): phần tư

one of four equal parts of something

Ex. Almost a quarter of respondents reported employment discrimination.

urine /ˈjʊəraɪn/ (n): nước tiểu

the waste liquid that collects in the bladder and that you pass from your body

Ex. I gagged at the stench of stale urine.

dehydration /ˌdiːhaɪˈdreɪʃn/ (n): mất nước

the condition of having lost too much water from your body

Ex. to suffer from dehydration

shrink /ʃrɪŋk/ (v): co lại

to become smaller, especially when washed in water that is too hot; to make clothes, cloth, etc. smaller in this way

Ex. My sweater shrank in the wash.

kidney /ˈkɪdni/ (n): thận

either of the two organs in the body that remove waste products from the blood and produce urine

Ex. a kidney infection

beverage /ˈbevərɪdʒ/ (n): đồ uống

any type of drink except water

Ex. Studies on the consumption of various alcoholic beverages have been conducted.

stroke /strəʊk/ (n): đột quỵ

sudden serious illness when a blood vessel (= tube) in the brain bursts (= breaks open) or is blocked, which can cause death or the loss of the ability to move or to speak clearly

Ex. Smoking increases the risk of stroke.

diabetes /ˌdaɪəˈbiːtiːz/ (n): béo phì

a medical condition in which the body cannot produce enough insulin to control the amount of sugar in the blood

Ex. Diabetes is diagnosed with a blood test.

Nguồn bài nghe

⇐ TRỞ LẠI TRANG THỬ THÁCH 

Với những bạn mới học IELTS Listening và cần khóa học luyện theo dạng bài bạn có thể tham khảo khóa học IELTS Listening Online cơ bản nhé. Còn với những bạn đang trong giai đoạn luyện đề với mục tiêu IELTS Listening 7+ bạn có thể tham khảo khóa luyện đề 3 giai đoạn – với bài tập theo dạng → theo Part → Full test kèm dịch đề, đáp án, từ vựng chi tiết nhé.

[products ids=”6842″]
[products ids=”20914″]

3/5 - (2 bình chọn)

Viết một bình luận

facebook-icon
zalo-icon
phone-icon
mail-icon